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Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry in the Australian Capital Territory, 2016

Research by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural
and Resource Economics and Sciences

About my region
December 2016

circular graphic with inter-woven images of agriculture, forestry and fisheries activities

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© Commonwealth of Australia 2016

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ABARES 2016, Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry in the Australian Capital Territory, 2016. About my region, Canberra, December. CC BY 3.0.

ABARES project 43009

Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES)
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The Australian Government acting through the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, represented by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, has exercised due care and skill in preparing and compiling the information and data in this publication. Notwithstanding, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, ABARES, its employees and advisers disclaim all liability, including for negligence and for any loss, damage, injury, expense or cost incurred by any person as a result of accessing, using or relying upon information or data in this publication to the maximum extent permitted by law.

Acknowledgements
ABARES relies on the voluntary cooperation of farmers participating in the annual Australian Agricultural and Grazing Industries Survey, Australian Dairy Industry Survey, Australian Vegetable Growing Farms Survey and farm survey of irrigation farms in the Murray-Darling Basin to provide data used in the preparation of this report. Without their help, these surveys would not be possible. ABARES farm survey staff collected most of the information presented in this report through on-farm interviews with farmers. In addition, in 2015 a survey of sugarcane producing farms was conducted in Queensland and New South Wales.

This territory profile was updated by Clay Mifsud, Aruni Weragoda, Jeremy van Dijk, Peter Martin, Milly Lubulwa, Dale Ashton, Mark Oliver, Beau Hug, Robert Curtotti, Jacob Savage, Peter Lock, Geoff Dunn, Lucy Randall and Evert Bleys.

Contents

Sectors

Regional overview

Employment

Agricultural sector

Forestry sector
References

Tables

Number of farms, by industry classification 2014–15

Figures

Employment profile, November 2015
Value of agricultural production, 2014–15
Distribution of farms by estimated value of agricultural operations, 2014–15
Area of native forest, by tenure, Australian Capital Territory

Maps

Broad land use in Australian Capital Territory

Regional overview

The Australian Capital Territory (refer to land use map below) includes the major centres of Belconnen, Canberra, Gungahlin and Tuggeranong. The region covers a total area of around 2 431 square kilometres or 0.03 per cent of Australia's total area and is home to approximately 357 000 people (ABS 2011). Jervis Bay is not included in the Australian Capital Territory region in this report.

Agricultural land in the Australian Capital Territory occupies 370 square kilometres, or about 15 per cent of the region. Areas classified as conservation and natural environments (nature conservation, protected areas and minimal use) occupy 1 510 square kilometres, or 64 per cent of the region. The most common land use by area is nature conservation, which occupies 1 350 square kilometres or 57 per cent of the Australian Capital Territory.

Broad land use in the Australian Capital Territory

 Broad land use in the Australian Capital Territory. Refer to preceeding text.
Source: ABARES 2015

Employment

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data from the November 2015 Labour Force Survey indicate that around 213 100 people were employed in the Australian Capital Territory. Less than 1 per cent of all people employed in the Australian Capital Territory are employed in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing sector.

Public Administration and Safety was the largest employment sector with 61 700 people, followed by Health Care and Social Assistance with 21 200 people and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services with 19 400 people (refer to figure below). Other important employment sectors in the region were Education and Traning, Construction, and Retail Trade.

Display: Colour graph Tabular data Both graph and table

Employment profile, Australian Capital Territory, November 2015

Refer to tablular data for details:Employment profile, Australian Capital Territory, November 2014 Note: Annual average of the preceding 4 quarters
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, cat. no. 6291.0, Labour Force, Australia (ABS, 2015)

Agricultural sector

Value of agricultural production

In 2014–15, the gross value of agricultural production in the Australian Capital Territory was $8 million, which was less than 1 per cent of the total gross value of agricultural production in Australia ($53.6 billion). This is the most recent year for which ABS data are available.

The most important commodities in the Australian Capital Territory (refer to figure below) based on the gross value of agricultural production were cattle and calves ($3 million), followed by crops ($2 million), wool ($2 million) and sheep and lambs ($1 million). These commodities together contributed 98 per cent of the total value of agricultural production in the region.

Display: Colour graph Tabular data Both graph and table

Value of agricultural production, Australian Capital Territory, 2014–15

Refer to tablular data for details: Value of agricultural production, Australian Capital Territory, 2014–15
Note:
The graph shows only data published by the ABS. Some values were not published by the ABS to ensure confidentiality (shown as 'not available' in tabular data).
a The "Other commodities" category includes the total value of commodities not published as well as those with small values.
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, cat. no. 7503.0, Value of agricultural commodities produced, Australia (ABS, 2016b)
 

Number and type of farms

ABS data indicate that in 2014–15 there were 51 farms in the Australian Capital Territory with an estimated value of agricultural operations of $5 000 or more (refer to table below). The territory contains less than 1 per cent of all farm businesses in Australia.


Number of farms, by industry classification, Australian Capital Territory, 2014–15
Industry classification Australian Capital Territory Australia
Number of farms % of TerritoryNumber of farmsContribution of ACT
to Australian total
%


Note: Estimated value of agricultural operations $5 000 or more
   Industries that constitute less than 1 per cent of the region's industry are not shown
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics
Beef Cattle Farming (Specialised) 39 39.2 38 043 0.1
Sheep-Beef Cattle Farming 20 19.9 14 907 0.1
Sheep Farming (Specialised) 14 14.0 9 575 0.1
Horse Farming 6 6.0 8 374 0.1
Apple and Pear Growing 4 4.0 7 330 0.1
Grape Growing 4 4.0 5 820 0.1
Vegetable Growing (Outdoors) 4 4.0 4 294 0.1
Other 9 9.0 21 723 0.0
Total agriculture 100 100 110 068 0.1

Farms in the table above are classified according to the activities that generate most of their value of production. Beef cattle farms (39) were the most common, accounting for 39 per cent of all farms in the Australian Capital Territory, and less than 1 per cent of all beef cattle farms in Australia.

Estimated value of agricultural operations (EVAO) is a measure of the value of production from farms and a measure of their business size. Around 74 per cent of farms in the Australian Capital Territory region had an EVAO of less than $50 000 (refer to graph below). These farms accounted for 24 per cent of the total value of agricultural operations in 2014–15. In comparison, 3 per cent of farms in the territory had an EVAO of more than $350 000 and accounted for an estimated 23 per cent of the total value of agricultural operations in the Australian Capital Territory in 2014–15.

Display: Colour graph Tabular data Both graph and table

Distribution of farms by estimated value of agricultural operations, Australian Capital Territory, 2014–15

Refer to tablular data for details: Distribution of farms by estimated value of agricultural operations, Australian Capital Territory, 2013–14
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Forestry sector

In 2013–14, the total plantation area the Australian Capital Territory was approximately 7 700 hectares, comprised solely of softwood plantations. In 2014–15, the log harvest volume and values are included in the New South Wales state figures.

In 2011, there were approximately 128 400 hectares of native forests in the Australian Capital Territory region, comprised mainly of Eucalypt medium open (86 500 hectares) and Eucalypt medium woodland (29 700 hectares) forest types. Approximately 114 900 hectares of the native forests are in nature conservation reserves and 8 900 hectares are leasehold forest (refer to figure below).

Display: Colour graph Tabular data Both graph and table

Area of native forest, by tenure, Australian Capital Territory

Refer to tablular data for details: Area of native forest, by tenure for Australian Capital Territory
Source: ABARES Australia's State of the Forests Report 2013



Sales and service income in the Australian Capital Territory wood product industry was estimated at approximately $131 million in 2013–14.

In 2011, the Australian Capital Territory forestry sector employed 501 workers (0.3 per cent of the total employed workforce in the Australian Capital Territory) compared with 554 (0.3 per cent) in 2006. The number of people employed includes forestry support services and timber wholesaling.

References

ABS 2011, Census of Population and Housing, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra.

ABS 2015, Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, Nov 2015, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003, Australian Bureau Statistics, Canberra.

ABS 2016a, Agricultural Commodities, Australia, 2014–2015, cat. no. 7121.0, Australian Bureau Statistics, Canberra.

ABS 2016b, Value of Agricultural Commodities Produced, Australia, 2014–15, cat. no. 7503.0, Australian Bureau Statistics, Canberra.

ABARES 2015, Catchment scale land use of Australia – update March 2015, ABARES, Canberra, April. CC by 3.0. http://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/publications/display?url=http://143.188.17.20/anrdl/DAFFService/display.php?fid=pb_luausg9abll20150415_11a.xml

ABARES 2016, Australian forest and wood products statistics: September and December quarters 2015, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra, May.

Montreal Process Implementation Group for Australia and National Forest Inventory Steering Committee 2013, Australia's State of the Forests Report 2013, ABARES, Canberra, December.